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E-Business and Operations

Mission Statement
The department seeks to publish manuscripts that address the synergy between operations and web-based information technology. Papers that fit three broad themes: structuring and modeling of business processes using information technologies, planning and execution of business-to-business (B2B) operations, and design and operation of electronic auctions are of particular interest. This would include (but not limited to) topics such as e-business configuration, business process networks (BPN), transaction and revenue models: capacity/inventory and knowledge resources, web-based product development, B2B collaboration, and supplier & customer relationship management (SRM & CRM). Especially welcome are innovative analyses of issues arising in different techno-commerce platforms: e-procurement, e-selling, e-auction, and e-marketplaces.

The articles may draw upon a diverse set of research methods including economic modeling, data analysis, auction theory, and applications. Manuscripts must display scientific rigor and managerial relevance, irrespective of the research method. They should possess original content with a significant contribution to the OM literature. Theoretical manuscripts should establish why certain decisions are optimal. Domain specific manuscripts need to provide generalizations of existing methods. Methodological manuscripts should clearly establish superiority of new methods over existing ones.

Manuscripts should address important research problems, and should help stimulate future research. They should also be well executed and technically flawless.

Departmental Editor
Professor Amiya K. Chakravarty
Operations and Technology Management
College of Business Administration
Hayden Hall, Suite 214
Northeastern University
Boston, MA 02115, USA
Phone: (617) 373-3690
akc@neu.edu

Senior Editors
Jian Chen, Tsinghua University
Amitava Dutta, George Mason University
Geoffrey Parker, Tulane University
Richard Steinberg, London School of Economics